Meet Your Maladies with Malacards

Malacards

Malacards is a database indexing human diseases. Each entry known as a “disease card”, includes annotations on the malady including aliases and colloquial terms for the disease, symptoms, drugs used for treatment, affiliated genes, academic articles on the subject (full-text of the articles can be searched in “Start Your Research”), and related diseases.

The annotation, in many instances, concerning related diseases will include a graphic illustrating the connection between maladies and links to their entries within Malacards.

Diagram of network of disaeses

Malacards, with over 18,000 diseases and disorders listed, is a valuable resource and study guide for health and medicine students. Log in to Malacards to find out more.

Research Consultations

Did you know that Round Rock Campus librarians are available for research consultations by appointment? The librarians will be able to help point you in the right direction to begin your research by explaining appropriate databases, field-related periodicals and books, as well as direct you to helpful formatting and citation resources.

Selecting the “Ask a Librarian @ RRC” on the RRC Library homepage is the first step towards requesting an appointment. Towards the bottom of the Ask a Librarian: Round Rock Campus Library page there is a box titled “More Ways to Help”, where a “Make an Appointment” link is present. This is the link that will lead you to the Request a Research Consultation form.

Link to research consultation formThis is the standard Request a Research Consultation form for both the Round Rock Campus Library and Alkek Library in San Marcos. The form suggests that appointments can be made Monday through Friday, 8am-5pm, however, at the Round Rock Campus, appointments can be made from 9am – 6pm, Monday through Thursday, 9am – 4pm on Friday. Be sure to select the Round Rock Campus and librarians Anthony Guardado or Josh Brynildsen in order to be in contact with RRC librarians.

The Round Rock Campus librarians are always happy to assist students with their research, so make an appointment and Come In and Find Out More.

Take a Dip in the Cool, Refreshing Waters of Streaming Media

It is too hot to go outside. Not only is it uncomfortable, but it could also be a danger to your health.

Now, one may argue that staying indoors with the blinds drawn for months on end will stifle one’s ability to explore and become familiar with the world. My rebuttal would be that all Texas State University students, staff, and faculty have access to the University Library and its content, which includes a number of databases that offer access to streaming movies.

From the Library’s Databases page, you’ll notice a column on the right side of the screen. At the top of the column you’ll find several links, one marked “streaming”. Follow this link to the list of databases offering streaming media, including movies.

 

streaming link

 

At this point you may argue, “Come one, these are all gonna be bland and boring educational documentaries design for academic instruction. That isn’t something I’m going to want to watch while I’m trying to enjoy my summer out of the heat.” This time my rebuttal would have to be, “You’re wrong.”

Kanopy, a streaming film service, provides access to many, many films that make up the Criterion Collection along with many other feature films. And while documentaries are very much available, the films are popular documentaries, made for the wider population with the intent to entertain as well as inform. Recent films, such as I am Not Your Negro and American Anarchist are available.

Films on Demand is another service offered through the University Library. This database offers streaming documentaries from the likes of PBS, featuring their always engaging Frontline series and Ken Burns productions, the History Channel, and HBO, where you can watch the creepy new film about the Slender Man.

Like most databases available through Texas State, Kanopy and Films on Demand are accessible from home, however, feel free to Come In and Find Out More.

Request an Item from Alkek

Have you ever found a great resource using the Texas State University Library catalog only to be disappointed when you realize that it is only available at the Alkek Library in San Marcos? Well, did you know that you are able to request most items from Alkek to be delivered and held at the Round Rock Campus library?

Each entry in the catalog will have a check mark icon follows by the word “Request”.
request optionThis is a link to the form that will allow users to place a request to have an item sent to the location of your liking.

request form

Simply type in your NetID and password, then hit enter.

A second screen (see below) will appear asking where you want the item held.

request form 2

A message will be sent to your Bobcatmail when the item is available, inviting you to come in and find out more.

Welcome Back: Summer 2017

Welcome Back: Summer 2017

 

So it turns out Alice Cooper was wrong: School is not out forever. It is not even out for the Summer. Though knowing the central Texas heat, spending time in the air-conditioned Avery Building is a pretty wise decision. Spending time in the Round Rock Campus Library, located in Avery Room 255, would be an even better decision.

image of sun shinning on generic calendar page

The RRC Library offers a number of resources and services that can help you out. There are 11 public computers available in RM 255 and another 27 in RM 255D within the library. These computers have access to the full Microsoft Office Suite, a number of Adobe products, and other pieces of software. They are also connected to both a black and white and color printer. And of course students have access to all of the Texas State University Library’s online resources through these computers.

 

Students will also have access to the library staff who are available to answer questions, help guide research, and assist with circulation. Librarians Anthony Guardado and Josh Brynildsen are also available for research consultations. Welcome to the RCC Library for the Summer 2017 term. Please, Come In And Find Out More.

Happy Earth Day

This Saturday, April 22nd, will be the 47th annual celebration of Earth Day. Founded in 1970 by Senator Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin, Earth Day was meant to bring awareness to issues such as pollution, sustainability, and endangered species. The passage of bills such as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act as well as the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency have been attributed to the success of the observation (2017).

Texas State University Libraries offer a number of resources to help with environmental literacy. A number of databases available through the libraries’ website are dedicated to the environmental studies. For example, Ebsco’s Environment Complete provides full-text access to scholarly articles on a number of topics related to the study of environments. BioOne Complete offers access to a number of journals published by smaller environmentally minded societies that may not be currently indexed elsewhere.

environmental studies database

The Round Rock Campus Library encourages you to have a fun and mindful Earth Day weekend. A day at the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at the San Marcos Campus could be enjoyable. But when it’s time to get back to studying, stop by the Round Rock Campus Library … Come in and Find Out More.

 

(2017). The History of Earth Day. Retrieved from http:// http://www.earthday.org/about/the-history-of-earth-day/

The Path to the Periodical List

Have you ever needed to quickly access a single, particular periodical: a newspaper, a magazine, or a scholarly journal? Did you know that you can quickly access that publication through Texas State Libraries’ Periodical List?

Periodical List 1

The Periodical List allows users to search for publications by title, ISSN (International Standard Serial Number), or Subject. Also, users can browse by discipline. For instance, check out the 3,591 education journals available through the University Libraries or the 105 Dance journals.

Periodical List 2

Titles located through the Periodical list will provide links to full-text access (when available), making the quest for scholarly information easier. Don’t forget about the Periodical List when needing to retrace a citation, or stop by the Round Rock Campus library – Come in and Find Out More.

All the News

The New York Times is available to students, faculty, and staff of Texas State University through the University Libraries.

Perhaps the quickest way to gain access to The New York Times is to locate the US Major Dailies through the libraries’ database page. Here users can access the full-text of the daily print edition from June 1, 1980 through the current day, the online edition from March 24, 2015 through the present, the weekly New York Times Book Review from January 19, 1997 though present, and New York Times Magazine from January 5, 1997 through the present issue. US Major Dailies also provides full-text access to the several edition of the Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post

.US major Dailes

Full-text articles from The New York Times are also available LexisNexis Academic, Opposing View Points in Context, and Science in Context.

 The New York Times Upfront, the publication’s news magazine for young people, can be found in full-text at Education Source and MasterFILE Complete.

While articles are available in full-text through these resources, unfortunately, no images are available and the original formatting is not present.

If you are curious as to how to read The New York Times stop by the Round Rock Campus. Come In and Find out More.     

The Birds (Not the Movie)

If you have not yet seen the amateur video of a flock of turkeys walking in a circle around a dead cat, check it out here.

Man, that is creepy.

From walking in a circle around a dead cat (Wild Turkeys), to pole-to-pole migration (Arctic Tern), to learning to talk (Common Raven), birds can be an interesting bunch. Fortunately, Texas State University Libraries offers Birds of North America Online through its database collection to help explain (and/or celebrate) all of the idiosyncrasies of our avian neighbors.

illustration of Birds of North America logo

Birds of North America is a searchable database, organized by species, offering information on every fowl found in from Panama to Canada. For each species, a number of full-color images are available depicting both male and female throughout the lifespan. Charts on molting are also included.

Reports on behavior, diet, and vocalization (the Willow Ptarmigan) are included in each species’ entry. Migration information is also included, with some species getting a really impressive video plotting their course from south to north and back week by week (American Redstart).

The Round Rock Campus Library would like to invite anyone in to Come In and Find Out More before you head out to Spring Break … After all, South Padre Island is a premier birding destination.

Stay Informed with Congressional Publications

Did you know that Representative John R. Carter is currently sponsoring 30 pieces of legislation, two of which have already passed within the House of Representatives? Where you aware that during the 114th Congress (2015-2016) Senator John Cornyn voted with the majority 83% of the time? How about Ted Cruz’s chairmanship of the Subcommittee on Science, Space, and Competitiveness?

Did you know that through ProQuest’s Congressional Publications, available through Texas State University Libraries’ databases, you can help you stay informed with what’s happening within the United States Congress?

us capitol

Congressional Publications allows users to search legislation (introduced to signed into law) by topic or title. Returns will provide summaries of the legislation, links to full text reports of debates concerning the legislation, the multiple versions of the bill, reports and hearings related to the bill, and a link to Bill Profile Report, which includes list of sponsors and co-sponsors, the bill’s status, and even links to the legislation’s full-text.

Congressional Publications also allows users to search by member. A member search will link users to a Member Profile page that will offer a brief biography, contact information (including links to social media), tabs listing sponsored legislation, committee membership, statements from the floor, voting history, a record of campaign finance, and a sample of social media posts.

Let Congressional Publications and the Round Rock Campus Library keep you informed.