Happy Holidays

The Jewish holiday of Tu Bi-Shevat occurs on the 15th day of Shevat, falling on January 30, 2018. The Round Rock Campus Library is giving you plenty of time to prepare.

Tu Bi-Shevat, the New Year for Trees or Arbor Day, was the cut-off date for tithing regarding the production of orchards, determined by the rainy seasons within Israel. Evert W. van de Poll, in his book, Messianic Jews and their Holiday Practice: History, Analysis and Gentile Christian Interest, interprets the spiritual significance of the holiday as signifying “the goodness of God in creation; for others [Messianic Jews] it signifies the need for believers in Jesus to be like a tree that bears abundant fruit”.

tree

Texas State University Libraries’ offers a number of ebooks and online encyclopedias filled with all sorts of information. The information concerning Tu Bi-Shevat was found in The New Encyclopedia of Judaism available through Credo Reference, the Encyclopaedia Judaica from Gale Encyclopedias, and Messianic Jews and Their Holiday Practice supplied by eBook Central. For more information on ebooks, digital reference books, or obscure Jewish holidays … Come In and Find Out More.

 

New year for trees. (2002). In G. Wigoder, F. Skolnik, & S. Himelstein (Eds.), The new       encyclopedia of Judaism (2nd ed.). New York, NY: New York University Press.               Retrieved from http://libproxy.txstate.edu/login?url=http://search.credoreference.com/content/entry/nyu            pencyjud/new_year_for_trees/0?institutionId=1143

van, D. P. E. W. (2015). Messianic jews and their holiday practice : history, analysis and      gentile christian interest. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.libproxy.txstate.edu

Ydit, M. (2007). Tu Bi-Shevat. In M. Berenbaum & F. Skolnik (Eds.), Encyclopaedia            Judaica (2nd ed., Vol. 20, p. 167). Detroit: Macmillan Reference USA. Retrieved              from http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/CX2587520083/GVRL.encyclopedias?u=txshracd25 50&sid=GVRL.encyclopedias&xid=26a1077f